The Role of Colocation Data Centres in a Changing IT Reality






 IT infrastructure is heading full speed toward a cloud-enabled future.

Gartner projects that by 2018, enterprise IT spending will surpass $3.2 trillion, up from $2.7 trillion in 2013. Cloud spending will make up a significant portion of this new spend.

Whilst the trend towards cloud computing is impossible to deny, it remains unclear at what speed enterprise cloud adoption is taking place, which cloud deployment model will be chosen, what the impact on legacy IT will be and how enterprises will connect their on-premise data centres with their off-premise cloud platforms.

We see a trend of enterprises choosing to consolidate their infrastructure and migrate toward cloud platforms in order to reduce their IT operating costs and increase scalability and flexibility. But, while these benefits are universal, the paths enterprises are taking along the cloud adoption journey are diverse. However, ‘hybrid IT’ is fast becoming the norm.

The term Hybrid IT refers to a new compute model which combines public and/or private clouds with the enterprise on-premise legacy IT infrastructure.

With security and performance often quoted as the primary barriers to widespread cloud adoption and the complexity of connecting on- and off-premise workloads and applications, hybrid IT is – to a large degree – a networking challenge.

To meet this networking challenge, some colocation data centre providers are maturing their offerings with specific networking solutions that support the transition to a hybrid IT reality. By operating switching infrastructure and supporting the necessary network capacity, these colocation data centres enable private access to the private connect nodes of the major cloud service providers via a virtual VLAN.

These solutions reduce complexity and costs of connecting the on- and off-premise IT.

To explore enterprise cloud adoption and the trends described above, we’ve commissioned IDG Connect to survey 625 IT decision makers in midsize and large enterprises across Europe about their current infrastructure set-up and future plans. The research is looking to answer a number of important questions on enterprise cloud adoption:

  • To what extent is enterprise cloud adoption becoming a reality in 2015?
  • Which cloud adoption model (public, private or hybrid) will prevail?
  • What will the role of corporate data centres be in the cloud era?
  • How will on-premise and cloud-based IT infrastructure be connected?
  • What will cloud 2020 look like?

The answers to these questions will help IT decision-makers to understand the decisions their peers are making in the process of integrating legacy IT with cloud computing models.

To learn more, please register for the webinar I'll be hosting on February 18th. The webinar will cover a presentation of the main research findings and a discussion with industry leaders about the Rise of Hybrid IT.