INEX - At The Core Of The Irish Internet

Case study

INEX, Ireland’s Internet peering exchange, benefits on multiple levels from working with Interxion. Secure hosting and connectivity, plus access to potential new members, allows it to continually improve its services.

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The Challenge

As the national peering point for Ireland, INEX has over 90 per cent of the internet eyeballs on the island of Ireland connected via its members. As a critical element of Ireland’s internet infrastructure, INEX needs data centre operators capable of providing the necessary secure physical space for its switches, as well as providing high quality connectivity and being conveniently located for other network operators and content providers.

“We have to be in facilities that are professionally run and secure. We need to make sure that they are resilient, safe, and have adequate power and UPS,” said Eileen Gallagher, head of marketing and membership development at INEX. “The most important thing when you run an internet exchange is that you are where the traffic is. INEX exists to enhance interconnectivity between networks; if you’re forcing everyone to put in additional infrastructure to reach you that defeats the purpose,” she added.

We have to be in facilities that are professionally run and secure. We need to make sure that they are resilient, safe, and have adequate power and UPS.

Solution

Working with Interxion, INEX manages a complex web of network connections, acting as the station-master ensuring all of the IP traffic is passed to its destination network at the lowest latency. INEX has placed switching equipment at Interxion’s DUB1 and DUB2 data centres on the western side of the Irish capital. The sites are connected to each other and the wider INEX network by dedicated, resilient fibre links.

“Interxion has been more than helpful at every stage of the process and has been incredibly supportive of INEX. As a not-for profit organisation that is important to us,” said Gallagher. “Moreover, the advantage of locating equipment at Interxion’s Dublin facilities is that many current and prospective INEX members are also based there. This has a direct business benefit for INEX, as the ability to attract new members allows them to keep lowering their membership charges.” “Even though we’re a not-for-profit association, we’re working in a commercial world so we have to be astute and deliver more value to members, some of whom have been with INEX since the very beginning.

That’s exactly why it’s important to be in an environment like Interxion where we can reach other members – to be somewhere we can grow,” said Gallagher. It is a win-win arrangement for everyone, since connectivity with Ireland’s internet exchange is a compelling proposition for inward investment, as Ireland looks to attract large content players to its shores. Gallagher highlights the strong working relationship between INEX and Interxion in this respect. “When we establish a PoP in a data centre like Interxion, we work closely with them to ensure that the benefits that INEX delivers are communicated to their customers.”

About INEX

INEX, the Irish Neutral Internet Exchange, is a carrier-neutral, not-for-profit peering facility owned by its members. Founded in 1996, it provides IP peering facilities for 56 trafficking members and has a further 17 associate members. INEX membership is open to all organisations that can benefit from peering their IP traffic. www.inex.ie